Monitoring Camel with Prometheus in Red Hat OpenShift

This walk-through example will encourage you to build an Apache Camel application from scratch, deploy it in a Kubernetes environment, gather metrics using Prometheus and display them in Grafana. Monitoring will automatically adjust when the system scales up or down. Table of Contents Introduction About Prometheus To-Do overview Scraping data The application Enabling Prometheus Enabling … Read moreMonitoring Camel with Prometheus in Red Hat OpenShift

Release Management with OpenShift: Under the hood

If you think about Release Management with OpenShift, you’re automatically thinking about Jenkins. With Jenkins you can easily setup a Release Pipeline for your App(s) and Jenkins is tightly integrated into OpenShift. There are a lot of Demos out there which are describing the best practices of using it. And OpenShift becomes more and more … Read moreRelease Management with OpenShift: Under the hood

Installing Gogs Git Server on OpenShift and make it using WebHooks to trigger builds

Preparation Based on the following github.com project, we are going to set up a Gogs Git-Server on our local OpenShift Environment, which we have set up here: http://www.opensourcerers.org/setting-enterprise-openshift-3-5-platform-macos-virtualbox/ https://github.com/OpenShiftDemos/gogs-openshift-docker As we want to reuse our Gogs Server for some situations, we need to use the persistent version of the Template. First of all we need … Read moreInstalling Gogs Git Server on OpenShift and make it using WebHooks to trigger builds

Setting up an Enterprise OpenShift 3.5 Platform on macOS with VirtualBox

I am a middleware guy. I am one of those guys who love to think about solving implementation problems. I am not necessarily one of those guys who love to dig into the infrastructure part too much. Typically, required things should be there so that I can use them for my work. But since some … Read moreSetting up an Enterprise OpenShift 3.5 Platform on macOS with VirtualBox

OPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 6: CONTROLLING EGRESS TRAFFIC

OpenShift 3.3 and later contain the functionality to route pod traffic to the external world via a well-defined IP address. This is useful for example if your external services are protected using a firewall and you do not want to open the firewall to all cluster nodes. The way it works is that a egress … Read moreOPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 6: CONTROLLING EGRESS TRAFFIC

OPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 5: OPENSHIFT ROUTER

In the OpenShift world, Services take place on the OSI Layer 3 / IP, while Routing is an OSI Layer 7 / HTTP/TLS concept. Once you’ve wrapped your head around this backwards choice of naming, things are fairly easy: An OpenShift Router is a component which listens on a physical host’s HTTP/S ports for incoming … Read moreOPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 5: OPENSHIFT ROUTER

OPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 4: CONTAINER NETWORKING USING OPENSHIFT/KUBERNETES SERVICES

To allow stable endpoints in an environment of ever changing starting and stopping Pods (and therefore constantly changing IP addresses), Kubernetes introduces (and OpenShift uses) the concept of services. Services are stable IP addresses (taken per default from the 172.30.0.0/16 subnet) that remain the same as long as the service exists. Connection requests to a … Read moreOPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 4: CONTAINER NETWORKING USING OPENSHIFT/KUBERNETES SERVICES

OPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 3: CONTAINER NETWORKING ACROSS OPENSHIFT NODES

So far, this sounds like a lot of effort to achieve a little more than a plain docker host – containers that can talk to each other and to the host network, potentially segregated based on kubernetes namespace. However OpenShift SDN also allows pods on different nodes to communicate with each other. To this end, … Read moreOPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 3: CONTAINER NETWORKING ACROSS OPENSHIFT NODES

OpenShift Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 2: Container Networking on an OpenShift Node

In OpenShift, networking is equally simple from a container point of view. Within the container’s namespace there is a eth0 network interface configured and services such as DNS just work. You can still use dedicated NICs on the host to isolate specific types of traffic. What’s the difference? It turns out there is hardly any … Read moreOpenShift Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 2: Container Networking on an OpenShift Node

OpenShift 3.1 Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 1: Container Networking on a plain Docker Host

From a container point of view, networking on a plain Docker Host is simple. A running container is nothing more than a Linux process which is namespaced and constrained with regards to access (SELinux) and resource consumption (cgroups). In each namespace, there is a single (virtual) network interface called eth0 which is assigned an IP … Read moreOpenShift 3.1 Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 1: Container Networking on a plain Docker Host