Monitoring Camel with Prometheus in Red Hat OpenShift

This walk-through example will encourage you to build an Apache Camel application from scratch, deploy it in a Kubernetes environment, gather metrics using Prometheus and display them in Grafana. Monitoring will automatically adjust when the system scales up or down. Table of Contents Introduction About Prometheus To-Do overview Scraping data The application Enabling Prometheus Enabling … Read moreMonitoring Camel with Prometheus in Red Hat OpenShift

OPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 6: CONTROLLING EGRESS TRAFFIC

OpenShift 3.3 and later contain the functionality to route pod traffic to the external world via a well-defined IP address. This is useful for example if your external services are protected using a firewall and you do not want to open the firewall to all cluster nodes. The way it works is that a egress … Read moreOPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 6: CONTROLLING EGRESS TRAFFIC

OPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 5: OPENSHIFT ROUTER

In the OpenShift world, Services take place on the OSI Layer 3 / IP, while Routing is an OSI Layer 7 / HTTP/TLS concept. Once you’ve wrapped your head around this backwards choice of naming, things are fairly easy: An OpenShift Router is a component which listens on a physical host’s HTTP/S ports for incoming … Read moreOPENSHIFT NETWORKING FROM A CONTAINER/WORKLOAD POINT OF VIEW – PART 5: OPENSHIFT ROUTER

OpenShift Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 2: Container Networking on an OpenShift Node

In OpenShift, networking is equally simple from a container point of view. Within the container’s namespace there is a eth0 network interface configured and services such as DNS just work. You can still use dedicated NICs on the host to isolate specific types of traffic. What’s the difference? It turns out there is hardly any … Read moreOpenShift Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 2: Container Networking on an OpenShift Node

OpenShift 3.1 Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 1: Container Networking on a plain Docker Host

From a container point of view, networking on a plain Docker Host is simple. A running container is nothing more than a Linux process which is namespaced and constrained with regards to access (SELinux) and resource consumption (cgroups). In each namespace, there is a single (virtual) network interface called eth0 which is assigned an IP … Read moreOpenShift 3.1 Networking from a container/workload point of view – Part 1: Container Networking on a plain Docker Host

First Fuse application on OpenShift V3.1

Since mid of December 2015, Red Hat has released the initial version of the Fuse Integration Services. These are various pre-build images which are aimed to make the implementation of Red Hat JBoss Fuse applications on OpenShift V3 as seamless as possible. In this blog I will document the steps required to create a first … Read moreFirst Fuse application on OpenShift V3.1